Monday, March 15, 2010

Social Corprate Responsibility

o1) Vicabulary work

b) What is the difference between social and corporate responsibility?
c) What is the history of the "Corporate social responsibility" term?
d) What is the significance of this term?
e) What are the positive benefits of SCR?
f) What are the negative aspects?

2) Whatch the Video and Explain the concept of Corporate Responsibility

Read the "Corporate Social Responsibility"article by Mallen Baker and answer the following questions:

a) How does the author of the article define CSR?
b) How does The World Business Council for Sustainable Development in its publication "Making Good Business Sense" by Lord Holme and Richard Watts define CSR?
c) How is the concept traditionally understood in United States?
d) What are the two aspects of their operations companies need to answer?
e) What is the “outer circle” stakeholders are taking an increasing interest in?
f) What is the European model more focused on?
g) Why does the author of the article believe this model is more sustainable?


3) Now read the CR facts published by BNET and answer the following questions:

a) What do 94% of company executives believe regarding Corporate Responsibility strategy?
b) How are companies in Europe and Japan different from those in Australia, New Zealand/Aotearoa and Asia?
c) Arrange the following companies according to the rate of corporate Responsibility reports they publish: US, Australian, British, Japanese,South African companies.
d) How does the author of the article prove that the financial contribution to society in the form of taxes has plummeted?
e) What is being reported about corporate profits in 2006 and 2007?
f) What about pay for top executives?
g) What do the following refer to: a day / in a year, 37% / 3.3%. ?

4) Study Cases:

1. IBM
2. Nokia
3. Vodaphone (Video Report)
4. McDonald's
5. Western Union
6. Orange

18 comments:

  1. Mallen Baker defines Corporate Social Responsibility as the manner in which different organizations manage business process and succeed in producing of a positive impact on society. The World Business Council for Sustainable Development in its publication "Making Good Business Sense" by Lord Holme and Richard Watts states that Corporate Social Responsibility is a contributory engagement of companies to the econonomic progress while improving the quality of life of society.
    In United States, CSR has been enucleated in terms of charitable model. Companies make profits and pay taxes. Then they make a contribution to a charitable Funds a certain share of the profits. The European model is focused on operating the core business in a socially responsible way, complemented by investment in communities for solid business case reasons. The author of the article believes this model is more sustainable because:
    - Social responsibility becomes an essential constituent part of the wealth creation process;
    - Difficult moments cause a motivating influence to practice CSR more and better;

    Puscas Marina

    ReplyDelete
  2. 2
    a) What do 94% of company executives believe regarding Corporate Responsibility strategy? development of a Corporate Responsibility strategy can deliver real business benefits.
    b) How are companies in Europe and Japan different from those in Australia, New Zealand/Aotearoa and Asia? Over 90% of companies in Europe and Japan with high environmental impacts have created policies for managing them, compared with 75% in Australia and New Zealand/Aotearoa and 15% in the rest of Asia.
    c) Arrange the following companies according to the rate of corporate Responsibility reports they publish: 3. US, 4. Australian, 2. British, 1. Japanese, 5. South African companies.
    d) How does the author of the article prove that the financial contribution to society in the form of taxes has plummeted? 1/3 of businesses in the UK do not pay any corporation tax, making the 'tax gap' between what they should pay and what they do around $93bn per year. * Half of all world trade passes through tax havens so that corporations can avoid paying tax. At least $11 trillion of assets are held offshore, over a third of the world's annual GDP.

    e) What is being reported about corporate profits in 2006 and 2007? Corporate profits in 2006 and 2007 were the highest on record
    f) What about pay for top executives? Pay for top executives in May 2007 was around double what they earned 10 years ago.
    g) What do the following refer to: a day / in a year, 37% / 3.3%. ? CEOs of large US companies make as much money in a day as an average US worker makes in a year/Average pay for directors of Britain's top companies rose 37% in 2006. Salares of workers rose 3.3%.

    ReplyDelete
  3. CSR definition according to the video: The CSR is the opportunity every individual has working with or in an organization whatever level, from the highest to the lowest to be a positive contributor to the needs of the community.
    1. a) How does the author of the article define CSR? CSR is about how companies manage the business processes to produce an overall positive impact on society.
    b) How does The World Business Council for Sustainable Development in its publication "Making Good Business Sense" by Lord Holme and Richard Watts define CSR? "Corporate Social Responsibility is the continuing commitment by business to behave ethically and contribute to economic development while improving the quality of life of the workforce and their families as well as of the local community and society at large"
    c) How is the concept traditionally understood in United States? CSR has been defined much more in terms of a philanthropic model. Companies make profits, unhindered except by fulfilling their duty to pay taxes. Then they donate a certain share of the profits to charitable causes. It is seen as tainting the act for the company to receive any benefit from the giving.
    d) What are the two aspects of their operations companies need to answer? 1. The quality of their management - both in terms of people and processes 2. The nature of, and quantity of their impact on society in the various areas.
    e) What is the “outer circle” stakeholders are taking an increasing interest in? what the company has actually done, good or bad, in terms of its products and services, in terms of its impact on the environment and on local communities, or in how it treats and develops its workforce. Out of the various stakeholders, it is financial analysts who are predominantly focused - as well as past financial performance - on quality of management as an indicator of likely future performance.
    f) What is the European model more focused on? The European model is much more focused on operating the core business in a socially responsible way, complemented by investment in communities for solid business case reasons.
    g) Why does the author of the article believe this model is more sustainable? Social responsibility becomes an integral part of the wealth creation process - which if managed properly should enhance the competitiveness of business and maximize the value of wealth creation to society. When times get hard, there is the incentive to practice CSR more and better - if it is a philanthropic exercise which is peripheral to the main business, it will always be the first thing to go when push comes to shove.

    ReplyDelete
  4. 2.Read the "Corporate Social Responsibility"article by Mallen Baker and answer the following questions:

    a) How does the author of the article define CSR?
    CSR is the opportunity that every individual has working with an organization which give the possibility to contribute positively to the needs of community and nation around them; it’s also about how companies manage the business processes to produce an overall positive impact on society.
    b) How does The World Business Council for Sustainable Development in its publication "Making Good Business Sense" by Lord Holme and Richard Watts define CSR?
    The World Business Council for Sustainable Development in its publication "Making Good Business Sense" by Lord Holme and Richard Watts defined CSR in the following way: "Corporate Social Responsibility is the continuing commitment by business to behave ethically and contribute to economic development while improving the quality of life of the workforce and their families as well as of the local community and society at large".
    c) How is the concept traditionally understood in United States?
    Traditionally in the United States, CSR has been defined much more in terms of a philanthropic model. Companies make profits, unhindered except by fulfilling their duty to pay taxes. Then they donate a certain share of the profits to charitable causes. It is seen as tainting the act for the company to receive any benefit from the giving.
    d) What are the two aspects of their operations companies need to answer?
    Companies need to answer to two aspects of their operations: 1. The quality of their management - both in terms of people and processes (the inner circle). 2. The nature of, and quantity of their impact on society in the various areas.
    e) What is the “outer circle” stakeholders are taking an increasing interest in?
    Outer circle represents the result of what the company has actually done, good or bad, in terms of its products and services, in terms of its impact on the environment and on local communities, or in how it treats and develops its workforce.
    f) What is the European model more focused on?
    The European model is much more focused on operating the core business in a socially responsible way, complemented by investment in communities for solid business case reasons.
    g) Why does the author of the article believe this model is more sustainable?
    From my point of view, this model is more sustainable because social responsibility becomes an integral part of the wealth creation process which should enhance the competitiveness of business and maximize the value of wealth creation to society. Also when times get hard, it is better to practice CSR more, because if it is a philanphropic exercise which is peripheral to the main business, it will always be the first thing to go when push comes to shove.

    ReplyDelete
  5. 3) Now read the CR facts published by BNET and answer the following questions:

    a) What do 94% of company executives believe regarding Corporate Responsibility strategy?
    94% of company executives believe the development of a Corporate Responsibility strategy can deliver real business benefits.
    b) How are companies in Europe and Japan different from those in Australia, New Zealand/Aotearoa and Asia?
    Over 90% of companies in Europe and Japan with high environmental impacts have created policies for managing them, compared with 75% in Australia and New Zealand/Aotearoa and 15% in the rest of Asia.
    c) Arrange the following companies according to the rate of corporate Responsibility reports they publish: US, Australian, British, Japanese,South African companies.
    80% of Japanese companies publish corporate Responsibility reports, compared with 71% of British, 32% US, 23% Australian and 18% of South African companies.
    d) How does the author of the article prove that the financial contribution to society in the form of taxes has plummeted?
    * 1/3 of businesses in the UK do not pay any corporation tax, making the 'tax gap' between what they should pay and what they do around $93bn per year. (5)
    * Half of all world trade passes through tax havens so that corporations can avoid paying tax. At least $11 trillion of assets are held offshore, over a third of the world's annual GDP.
    * Revenue losses to developing countries from corporation tax avoidance are at least $50bn, around the same as they receive in annual aid flows.
    e) What is being reported about corporate profits in 2006 and 2007?
    Corporate profits in 2006 and 2007 were the highest on record.
    f) What about pay for top executives?
    Pay for top executives in May 2007 was around double what they earned 10 years ago.

    g) What do the following refer to: a day / in a year, 37% / 3.3%. ?
    Average pay for directors of Britain's top companies rose 37% in 2006. Salaries of workers rose 3.3%.

    ReplyDelete
  6. CSR is about how companies manage the business processes to produce an overall positive impact on society.
    The World Business Council for Sustainable Development in its publication "Making Good Business Sense" by Lord Holme and Richard Watts, used the following definition. "Corporate Social Responsibility is the continuing commitment by business to behave ethically and contribute to economic development while improving the quality of life of the workforce and their families as well as of the local community and society at large"
    In the United States, CSR has been defined much more in terms of a philanphropic model. Companies make profits, unhindered except by fulfilling their duty to pay taxes. Then they donate a certain share of the profits to charitable causes.
    Companies need to answer to two aspects of their operations:
    a) The quality of their management - both in terms of people and processes.
    b) The nature of, and quantity of their impact on society in the various areas.
    Outside stakeholders are taking an increasing interest in the activity of the company. Most look to the outer circle - what the company has actually done, good or bad, in terms of its products and services, in terms of its impact on the environment and on local communities, or in how it treats and develops its workforce.
    The European model is much more focused on operating the core business in a socially responsible way, complemented by investment in communities for solid business case reasons.
    The author of the article believe this model is more sustainable because social responsibility becomes an integral part of the wealth creation process - which if managed properly should enhance the competitiveness of business and maximise the value of wealth creation to society. And also when times get hard, there is the incentive to practice CSR more and better - if it is a philanphropic exercise which is peripheral to the main business, it will always be the first thing to go when push comes to shove.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Read the "Corporate Social Responsibility"article by Mallen Baker and answer the following questions:

    a) How does the author of the article define CSR?
    The author defines the CSR like something about how companies manage the business processes to produce an overall positive impact on society.
    b) How does The World Business Council for Sustainable Development in its publication "Making Good Business Sense" by Lord Holme and Richard Watts define CSR?
    The World Business Council for Sustainable Development in its publication "Making Good Business Sense" by Lord Holme and Richard Watts, used the following definition. "Corporate Social Responsibility is the continuing commitment by business to behave ethically and contribute to economic development while improving the quality of life of the workforce and their families as well as of the local community and society at large"
    c) How is the concept traditionally understood in United States?
    Traditionally in the United States, CSR concept has been defined much more in terms of a philanphropic model and means that companies make profits, unhindered except by fulfilling their duty to pay taxes and after this they donate a certain share of the profits to charitable causes. It is seen as tainting the act for the company to receive any benefit from the giving.
    d) What are the two aspects of their operations companies need to answer?
    Companies need to answer to two aspects of their operations and the first one is the quality of their management - both in terms of people and processes (the inner circle), and the second one is the nature of, and quantity of their impact on society in the various areas.
    e) What is the “outer circle” stakeholders are taking an increasing interest in?
    The “outer circle” stakeholders are taking an increasing interest in represents what the company has actually done, good or bad, in terms of its products and services, in terms of its impact on the environment and on local communities, or in how it treats and develops its workforce.
    f) What is the European model more focused on?
    The European model is much more focused on operating the core business in a socially responsible way, complemented by investment in communities for solid business case reasons.
    g) Why does the author of the article believe this model is more sustainable?
    Personally, I believe this model is more sustainable because:
    1.Social responsibility becomes an integral part of the wealth creation process - which if managed properly should enhance the competitiveness of business and maximise the value of wealth creation to society.
    2.When times get hard, there is the incentive to practice CSR more and better - if it is a philanphropic exercise which is peripheral to the main business, it will always be the first thing to go when push comes to shove.

    ReplyDelete
  8. 3) Now read the CR facts published by BNET and answer the following questions:

    a) What do 94% of company executives believe regarding Corporate Responsibility strategy?
    94% of company executives believe the development of a Corporate Responsibility strategy can deliver real business benefits.
    b) How are companies in Europe and Japan different from those in Australia, New Zealand/Aotearoa and Asia?
    Over 90% of companies in Europe and Japan with high environmental impacts have created policies for managing them, compared with 75% in Australia and New Zealand/Aotearoa and 15% in the rest of Asia.
    c) Arrange the following companies according to the rate of corporate Responsibility reports they publish: US, Australian, British, Japanese,South African companies.
    80% of Japanese companies publish corporate Responsibility reports, compared with 71% of British, 32% US, 23% Australian and 18% of South African companies.
    d) How does the author of the article prove that the financial contribution to society in the form of taxes has plummeted?
    * 1/3 of businesses in the UK do not pay any corporation tax, making the 'tax gap' between what they should pay and what they do around $93bn per year. (5)
    * Half of all world trade passes through tax havens so that corporations can avoid paying tax. At least $11 trillion of assets are held offshore, over a third of the world's annual GDP. (7)
    * Revenue losses to developing countries from corporation tax avoidance are at least $50bn, around the same as they receive in annual aid flows. (8)
    e) What is being reported about corporate profits in 2006 and 2007?
    Corporate profits in 2006 and 2007 were the highest on record.
    f) What about pay for top executives?
    Pay for top executives in May 2007 was around double what they earned 10 years ago.

    g) What do the following refer to: a day / in a year, 37% / 3.3%. ?
    Average pay for directors of Britain's top companies rose 37% in 2006. Salaries of workers rose 3.3%.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Borovetchi EcaterinaApril 6, 2011 at 7:12 AM

    Ex. 2
    a) CSR is about how companies manage the business processes to produce an overall positive impact on society.
    b) "Corporate Social Responsibility is the continuing commitment by business to behave ethically and contribute to economic development while improving the quality of life of the workforce and their families as well as of the local community and society at large"c) How is the concept traditionally understood in United States?
    d) 1. The quality of their management - both in terms of people and processes (the inner circle). 2. The nature of, and quantity of their impact on society in the various areas
    e) what the company has actually done, good or bad, in terms of its products and services, in terms of its impact on the environment and on local communities, or in how it treats and develops its workforce.
    f) The European model is much more focused on operating the core business in a socially responsible way, complemented by investment in communities for solid business case reasons.
    g) Because: -Social responsibility becomes an integral part of the wealth creation process - which if managed properly should enhance the competitiveness of business and maximise the value of wealth creation to society.
    -When times get hard, there is the incentive to practice CSR more and better - if it is a philanphropic exercise which is peripheral to the main business, it will always be the first thing to go when push comes to shove.

    ReplyDelete
  10. 94% of company executives believe the development of a Corporate Responsibility strategy can deliver real business benefits.
    Over 90% of companies in Europe and Japan with high environmental impacts have created policies for managing them, compared with 75% in Australia and New Zealand/Aotearoa and 15% in the rest of Asia.
    The following companies are arranged according to the rate of corporate Responsibility reports they publish: 1. Japanese, 2. British, 3. US, 4. Australian, 5. South African companies.
    1/3 of businesses in the UK do not pay any corporation tax, making the 'tax gap' between what they should pay and what they do around $93bn per year. * Half of all world trade passes through tax havens so that corporations can avoid paying tax. At least $11 trillion of assets are held offshore, over a third of the world's annual GDP.
    Corporate profits in 2006 and 2007 were the highest on record.
    Pay for top executives in May 2007 was around double what they earned 10 years ago.
    Average pay for directors of Britain's top companies rose 37% in 2006. Salaries of workers rose 3.3%.

    ReplyDelete
  11. 2.a)CSR is about how companies manage the business processes to produce an overall positive impact on society.
    b)The World Business Council for Sustainable Development in its publication "Making Good Business Sense" by Lord Holme and Richard Watts, used the following definition. "Corporate Social Responsibility is the continuing commitment by business to behave ethically and contribute to economic development while improving the quality of life of the workforce and their families as well as of the local community and society at large"
    c)Traditionally in the United States, CSR has been defined much more in terms of a philanthropic model. Companies make profits, unhindered except by fulfilling their duty to pay taxes. Then they donate a certain share of the profits to charitable causes. It is seen as tainting the act for the company to receive any benefit from the giving
    d)Companies need to answer to two aspects of their operations. 1. The quality of their management - both in terms of people and processes (the inner circle). 2. The nature of, and quantity of their impact on society in the various areas.
    e) Stakeholders are taking an increasing interest in the activity of the company. Most look to the outer circle - what the company has actually done, good or bad, in terms of its products and services, in terms of its impact on the environment and on local communities, or in how it treats and develops its workforce. Out of the various stakeholders, it is financial analysts who are predominantly focused - as well as past financial performance - on quality of management as an indicator of likely future performance
    f)The European model is much more focused on operating the core business in a socially responsible way, complemented by investment in communities for solid business case reasons.
    g)The author believes this model is more sustainable because:
    Social responsibility becomes an integral part of the wealth creation process - which if managed properly should enhance the competitiveness of business and maximize the value of wealth creation to society.
    When times get hard, there is the incentive to practice CSR more and better - if it is a philanthropic exercise which is peripheral to the main business, it will always be the first thing to go when push comes to shove.

    ReplyDelete
  12. 3.a)94% of company executives believe the development of a Corporate Responsibility strategy can deliver real business benefits.
    b)Over 90% of companies in Europe and Japan with high environmental impacts have created policies for managing them, compared with 75% in Australia and New Zealand/Aotearoa and 15% in the rest of Asia.
    c)According to the rate of corporate Responsibility reports , we arrange companies in the next way : Japanese. British, US, Australian, and South African company.
    d)Corporations may be boasting about their social responsibility like never before, but their financial contribution to society in the form of taxes has plummeted.
    * 1/3 of businesses in the UK do not pay any corporation tax, making the 'tax gap' between what they should pay and what they do around $93bn per year. (5)
    * Half of all world trade passes through tax havens so that corporations can avoid paying tax. At least $11 trillion of assets are held offshore, over a third of the world's annual GDP.
    * Revenue losses to developing countries from corporation tax avoidance are at least $50bn, around the same as they receive in annual aid flows.
    e)Corporate profits in 2006 and 2007 were the highest on record.
    f) Pay for top executives in May 2007 was around double what they earned 10 years ago.
    g)Average pay for directors of Britain's top companies rose 37% in 2006. Salaries of workers rose 3.3%

    ReplyDelete
  13. a) How does the author of the article define CSR?
    CSR is about how companies manage the business processes to produce an overall positive impact on society.

    b) How does The World Business Council for Sustainable Development in its publication "Making Good Business Sense" by Lord Holme and Richard Watts define CSR?
    "Corporate Social Responsibility is the continuing commitment by business to behave ethically and contribute to economic development while improving the quality of life of the workforce and their families as well as of the local community and society at large"

    c) How is the concept traditionally understood in United States?
    Traditionally in the United States, CSR has been defined much more in terms of a philanphropic model. Companies make profits, unhindered except by fulfilling their duty to pay taxes. Then they donate a certain share of the profits to charitable causes. It is seen as tainting the act for the company to receive any benefit from the giving.
    d) What are the two aspects of their operations companies need to answer?
    Companies need to answer to two aspects of their operations. 1. The quality of their management - both in terms of people and processes (the inner circle). 2. The nature of, and quantity of their impact on society in the various areas.

    e) What is the “outer circle” stakeholders are taking an increasing interest in?
    what the company has actually done, good or bad, in terms of its products and services, in terms of its impact on the environment and on local communities, or in how it treats and develops its workforce.

    f) What is the European model more focused on?
    The European model is much more focused on operating the core business in a socially responsible way, complemented by investment in communities for solid business case reasons.

    g) Why does the author of the article believe this model is more sustainable?
    • Social responsibility becomes an integral part of the wealth creation process - which if managed properly should enhance the competitiveness of business and maximise the value of wealth creation to society.
    • When times get hard, there is the incentive to practice CSR more and better - if it is a philanphropic exercise which is peripheral to the main business, it will always be the first thing to go when push comes to shove.

    ReplyDelete
  14. a) What do 94% of company executives believe regarding Corporate Responsibility strategy?
    94% of company executives believe the development of a Corporate Responsibility strategy can deliver real business benefits.

    b) How are companies in Europe and Japan different from those in Australia, New Zealand/Aotearoa and Asia?
    Over 90% of companies in Europe and Japan with high environmental impacts have created policies for managing them, compared with 75% in Australia and New Zealand/Aotearoa and 15% in the rest of Asia.

    c) Arrange the following companies according to the rate of corporate Responsibility reports they publish: US, Australian, British, Japanese,South African companies.
    Japanese, British, US, Australian,South African.
    80% of Japanese companies publish corporate Responsibility reports, compared with 71% of British, 32% US, 23% Australian and 18% of South African companies.

    d) How does the author of the article prove that the financial contribution to society in the form of taxes has plummeted?
    1/3 of businesses in the UK do not pay any corporation tax, making the 'tax gap' between what they should pay and what they do around $93bn per year.
    * Half of all world trade passes through tax havens so that corporations can avoid paying tax. At least $11 trillion of assets are held offshore, over a third of the world's annual GDP.


    e) What is being reported about corporate profits in 2006 and 2007?
    Corporate profits in 2006 and 2007 were the highest on record.

    f) What about pay for top executives?
    Pay for top executives in May 2007 was around double what they earned 10 years ago

    g) What do the following refer to: a day / in a year, 37% / 3.3%. ?

    CEOs of large US companies make as much money in a day as an average US worker makes in a year.

    Average pay for directors of Britain's top companies rose 37% in 2006. Salaries of workers rose 3.3%.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Exercise nr.2
    a) How does the author of the article define CSR?
    The author of the article defines CSR as about how companies manage the business processes to produce an overall positive impact on society.

    b) How does The World Business Council for Sustainable Development in its publication "Making Good Business Sense" by Lord Holme and Richard Watts define CSR?
    The World Business Council for Sustainable Development in its publication "Making Good Business Sense" by Lord Holme and Richard Watts, used the following definition "Corporate Social Responsibility is the continuing commitment by business to behave ethically and contribute to economic development while improving the quality of life of the workforce and their families as well as of the local community and society at large".

    c) How is the concept traditionally understood in United States?
    The concept traditionally is understood like “Companies make profits, unhindered except by fulfilling their duty to pay taxes. Then they donate a certain share of the profits to charitable causes. It is seen as tainting the act for the company to receive any benefit from the giving.”

    d) What are the two aspects of their operations companies need to answer?
    Companies need to answer to two aspects of their operations:
    1. The quality of their management - both in terms of people and processes (the inner circle).
    2. The nature of, and quantity of their impact on society in the various areas.

    e) What is the “outer circle” stakeholders are taking an increasing interest in?
    Stakeholders are taking an increasing interest in the activity of the company. Most look to the outer circle - what the company has actually done, good or bad, in terms of its products and services, in terms of its impact on the environment and on local communities, or in how it treats and develops its workforce. Out of the various stakeholders, it is financial analysts who are predominantly focused - as well as past financial performance - on quality of management as an indicator of likely future performance.

    f) What is the European model more focused on?
    The European model is much more focused on operating the core business in a socially responsible way, complemented by investment in communities for solid business case reasons.

    g) Why does the author of the article believe this model is more sustainable?
    This model is more sustainable because:
    1) Social responsibility becomes an integral part of the wealth creation process - which if managed properly should enhance the competitiveness of business and maximize the value of wealth creation to society.
    2)When times get hard, there is the incentive to practice CSR more and better - if it is a philanthropic exercise which is peripheral to the main business, it will always be the first thing to go when push comes to shove.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Exercise nr.3
    a)What do 94% of company executives believe regarding Corporate Responsibility strategy?

    94% of company executives believe the development of a Corporate Responsibility strategy can deliver real business benefits.

    b) How are companies in Europe and Japan different from those in Australia, New Zealand/Aotearoa and Asia?
    Over 90% of companies in Europe and Japan with high environmental impacts have created policies for managing them, compared with 75% in Australia and New Zealand/Aotearoa and 15% in the rest of Asia.

    c) Arrange the following companies according to the rate of corporate Responsibility reports they publish: US, Australian, British, Japanese, South African companies.
    Japanese, British, US, Australian, South African companies

    d) How does the author of the article prove that the financial contribution to society in the form of taxes has plummeted?
    Corporations may be boasting about their social responsibility like never before, but their financial contribution to society in the form of taxes has plummeted.
    1/3 of businesses in the UK do not pay any corporation tax, making the 'tax gap' between what they should pay and what they do around $93bn per year.
    Half of all world trade passes through tax havens so that corporations can avoid paying tax. At least $11 trillion of assets are held offshore, over a third of the world's annual GDP.
    Revenue losses to developing countries from corporation tax avoidance are at least $50bn, around the same as they receive in annual aid flows.

    e) What is being reported about corporate profits in 2006 and 2007?
    Corporate profits in 2006 and 2007 were the highest on record.
    The top 20 private equity and hedge fund managers pocketed an average $657.5 million each in 2006.

    f) What about pay for top executives?
    Pay for top executives in May 2007 was around double what they earned 10 years ago.

    g) What do the following refer to: a day / in a year, 37% / 3.3%. ?
    CEOs of large US companies make as much money in a day as an average US worker makes in a year.
    Average pay for directors of Britain's top companies rose 37% in 2006. Salaries of workers rose 3.3%.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Borovetchi EcaterinaApril 7, 2011 at 3:02 AM

    a) 94% of company executives believe the development of a Corporate Responsibility strategy can deliver real business benefits.
    b) Over 90% of companies in Europe and Japan with high environmental impacts have created policies for managing them, compared with 75% in Australia and New Zealand/Aotearoa and 15% in the rest of Asia.
    c) Japanese(80%), British(71%), US(32%), Australian(23%), of South African(18%) companies.
    d) -1/3 of businesses in the UK do not pay any corporation tax, making the 'tax gap' between what they should pay and what they do around $93bn per year. (5)
    - Half of all world trade passes through tax havens so that corporations can avoid paying tax. At least $11 trillion of assets are held offshore, over a third of the world's annual GDP.

    e) Corporate profits in 2006 and 2007 were the highest on record.
    f)Pay for top executives in May 2007 was around double what they earned 10 years ago
    g) CEOs of large US companies make as much money in a day as an average US worker makes in a year.
    Average pay for directors of Britain's top companies rose 37% in 2006. Salaries of workers rose 3.3%.

    ReplyDelete
  18. CSR is about how companies manage the business processes to produce an overall positive impact on society.


    "Corporate Social Responsibility is the continuing commitment by business to behave ethically and contribute to economic development while improving the quality of life of the workforce and their families as well as of the local community and society at large"


    Traditionally in the United States, CSR has been defined much more in terms of a philanphropic model. Companies make profits, unhindered except by fulfilling their duty to pay taxes. Then they donate a certain share of the profits to charitable causes.


    · Social responsibility becomes an integral part of the wealth creation process - which if managed properly should enhance the competitiveness of business and maximise the value of wealth creation to society.
    · When times get hard, there is the incentive to practice CSR more and better - if it is a philanphropic exercise which is peripheral to the main business, it will always be the first thing to go when push comes to shove.


    Outside stakeholders are taking an increasing interest in the activity of the company. Most look to the outer circle - what the company has actually done, good or bad, in terms of its products and services, in terms of its impact on the environment and on local communities, or in how it treats and develops its workforce. Out of the various stakeholders, it is financial analysts who are predominantly focused - as well as past financial performance - on quality of management as an indicator of likely future performance.


    The European model is much more focused on operating the core business in a socially responsible way, complemented by investment in communities for solid business case reasons.

    Personally, I believe this model is more sustainable because:
    · Social responsibility becomes an integral part of the wealth creation process - which if managed properly should enhance the competitiveness of business and maximise the value of wealth creation to society.
    · When times get hard, there is the incentive to practice CSR more and better - if it is a philanphropic exercise which is peripheral to the main business, it will always be the first thing to go when push comes to shove.










    94% of company executives believe the development of a Corporate Responsibility strategy can deliver real business benefits.


    Over 90% of companies in Europe and Japan with high environmental impacts have created policies for managing them, compared with 75% in Australia and New Zealand/Aotearoa and 15% in the rest of Asia.


    Tax avoidance
    Corporations may be boasting about their social responsibility like never before, but their financial contribution to society in the form of taxes has plummeted.



    Corporate profits in 2006 and 2007 were the highest on record. Pay for top executives in May 2007 was around double what they earned 10 years ago.


    The top 20 private equity and hedge fund managers pocketed an average $657.5 million each in 2006.


    Average pay for directors of Britain's top companies rose 37% in 2006. Salaries of workers rose 3.3%.

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